Trust and Beliefs

“We can learn to trust others when they are being trustworthy, and learn to not trust them when they are not being trustworthy, but we need to learn when to trust ourselves in order to learn to tell the difference.” (The Rainbow Cards)

It is easy to be misled. We want to believe certain things. Sometimes, we want so badly to believe that we allow ourselves to be misled.

However, problems can arise from this in several ways. First problem is when we want to hold on to our beliefs so badly, that we act destructively towards others who we may see as challenging our beliefs. The second is when we then go on to help mislead others.

Everyone alive has different beliefs from everyone else alive.  Maybe not drastically or noticeably different beliefs, but somewhere in there, there are differences.  There is no avenue to dislodge someone else from their beliefs other than presenting different perspectives and different beliefs. This is because freewill is given to every soul, and will not be taken away from any soul.

We can be misled when we don’t have strong beliefs, and we can mislead others knowingly and unknowingly. We can also mislead ourselves. Every person has the freewill to choose what they will believe and hold to.  At the same time, we tend to think it’s the other person who has been misled and we are the ones with beliefs that are true.

Contrary to what one may think, one method of helping to not be misled by our self or by others is to keep an open and ever inquiring mind. It is a paradox, sometimes.  This is not an act of accepting everything we see and hear, but rather, working to understand in a deeper way that which could be new to us. This includes asking questions, asking more questions and then asking even more questions.

We are forever putting together an ever bigger paradigm of ourselves and the world in which we live.  The greater the paradigm of understanding, the stronger the foundation of that paradigm.

The act of knowing truth is a subjective act. It is not an experience that one person can give to another person. It is only an experience that we can own because of it coming from within our own heart, mind and soul. It may seem like “someone said something that rang true”, but had it not been within one’s own heart and soul first, it would not have “rung” at all.

With the great number of differing beliefs – about every facet of life – this then, is why I continue to mention, “It is not what we believe, but what we do with our beliefs, that is important.”  In other words, how do we motivate ourselves and others using our beliefs as the foundation?

It then behooves us to consider what then we  choose to believe – about ourselves, about others and about God.  We can choose to believe the very worst.  We can also choose to believe the very best.  Probably somewhere in between is what is actually true when we choose beliefs about individual people.  As Edgar Cayce said in one of his readings, “There is good in the worst of us, and there is bad in the best of us.”  Seeing life as one or the other, but not both – good or bad, white or black, left or right, right or wrong and not seeing the blending of the two within every person – good and bad together in one person – white and black together in one person – left and right together in one person – right and wrong together in one person – is the belief where we mislead ourselves the most.

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“What is to be asked of ourselves is, do we want our beliefs or do we want the truth?  Holding onto just the first can sometimes prevent the second.  Allowing for more than just the first, can help discover the second.” (The Rainbow Cards, ©, 2018, Jodie Senkyrik)

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To Believe or Not to Believe

We are at a time in our world, with technology, politics, social media and “everything else going on in the world”, where we sometimes don’t know what’s true or what isn’t. Very “loud” conflicts are happening with people on each side claiming the people on the other side are disseminating fake news. The “noise” level is so loud, that it can be very easy to not know what to believe or who to believe.

Now, in a “seeming” change of topic, at last count, there are more than 7.3 billion people on this planet. Of these 7,300,000,000 people, there are no two who are exactly alike. Because we’re different, because we’ve experienced different things in life – all through our life, we, therefore, have experienced different experiences, met different role models, mentors and teachers, felt different feelings, and thought different thoughts about and through all our lives. I mention this, because there are no two people who believe 100% exactly the same in all things of life. So, therefore, all 7.3 billion of us believe different things to be either true or false.

We may not know what is true, but so what. Our own dogged search for the truth via our seeking it from God can be chosen or not chosen per our own freewill.  7.3 billion people believe different things are true. Throughout all of mankind’s history, this has never been the actual source of the problem – beliefs being different. Having different beliefs has always been the way life is, anyway. It’s not a problem, because it’s not the cause of problems. Believing different things are true, is not a problem.

The problem is with how we relate to our beliefs, and therefore, motivate our own actions. In other words, what do we do with our beliefs? What actions do we take regarding our beliefs?

This is where problems arise. With different beliefs, do we choose to bring forth cooperation with others or do we choose to create conflict with others? Do we use our beliefs about what is true or not true to feel an underlying compassion for others or instead an underlying condemning of others? Do we use our beliefs to bring pain and suffering into people’s lives, or do we use our beliefs to motivate us to offer mercy, understanding and tolerance?

The issue is not what we believe, but what we do with our beliefs. Our actions and behaviors – how we relate and respond to others – determines how we walk in this world. It’s possible to believe exactly opposite than someone else, but with both people choosing for themselves to be kind, tolerant and compassionate, there will come to be peace and respect among them. We know people in our lives now, who believe differently than we do, but because they choose to show kindness, respect and patience, we enjoy their company. And there are people in our lives who we may believe so very similar, but yet they choose their behaviors towards others in such a way that we can’t wait to leave the room when they’re in it.

How do we use our beliefs? To help build separation and animosity, or to help build mercy and unity? We can profess to have the highest of beliefs, and even believe that “we know the truth”, but our behaviors and actions will speak more truth than our mind will hold or our mouth will speak. Our behaviors can become so loud, that no one can hear what we profess, anymore.

Actions speak louder than words, and our actions that we demonstrate – loving kindness or condemning judgment – are what shows how we relate to this world full of people. It is truly possible that billions of people can live in peace… and even with different beliefs.

Still, you may believe differently than this, …

and God bless you for it.

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“We have eternity to work this out.” Jesus Christ

“Everything broken can be fixed. Every mess can be cleaned up.  Everything separated can be rejoined.” Jesus Christ

“With God, all things are possible.” Jesus Christ

Freewill and Judgement Question

I wonder how you define freewill, I’m a bit theologically curious. I don’t think God is as non judgmental as you seem to [think], and I think you are giving him a get out of jail free card on some things. And my bias is Christian…  V.

Thanks for the comment and question. (Here’s my answer.  I’m sure others would have other answers.)

More important than my understanding of freewill and more important than our differences in our beliefs is the question, “What do we do with our beliefs?”

The world will never have “Peace on Earth, and Goodwill towards all men” if we think we all must believe the same way, because that’s not going to happen.  But, if we look at the question of what do we do with our beliefs, or to what use do we put our beliefs, or how do our own beliefs serve us?, then as we answer this or these questions, our answers will determine how we treat and relate to God, ourselves, and each other.

If we use our beliefs to strengthen our kindness, our compassion, our understanding, mercy and forgiveness, our support, our encouragement, our willingness to hold the hand of those who need a helping hand, then we will find that the world does indeed gain more “Peace on Earth and Goodwill towards all men.”

But, if we use our beliefs to condemn, to criticize, to judge, or to carry out our own vengeance, or our own bitterness, resentment, or hatred, then we will not achieve that which Christ has come to establish.  We can use our beliefs to bury people in guilt and shame.  We can use our beliefs to symbolically stone people to death, until they despair and lose all sense of hope for themselves.  We can use our beliefs to chain and imprison people in blame.   We can use our beliefs in any number of ways to bury people under the weight of the entire world, if we want to choose that.

Regardless of what God chooses to do, to judge or not judge, we can choose, within our own hearts and minds, the beliefs, acts, thoughts and feelings which we want to follow and become who we choose to be.  This is how I define freewill – making a choice on our/my own actions, our/my own feelings, our/my own thoughts, and our/my own beliefs, and then following through with them.

This may seem to some people to contradict the fact that we live on a planet that has a system of justice and imprisonment.  This is a reality on our planet, but each of us still has the choice within us as to whether we condemn another or hate another within our own heart.  Even those that commit crimes, that go through our criminal system, and that are imprisoned – these men and women are loved by someone, and most certainly by Christ,  in addition to being the recipients of Infinite Love from our Infinite God, who also offers Infinite Forgiveness, Infinite Understanding, Infinite Mercy to you, me and everyone else.

This means that everyone, no matter what we, of our own freewill have chosen to act out, or think, or believe, — everyone is already worthy enough to be loved — with no exceptions — and no one can stop this love going to another person.  We can only stop what comes to ourselves.

When we realize this is for all of us, and let the Infinite Expressions of God come forth for all of us, then we have (to use the common phrase) “accepted the keys to the kingdom” – the keys to that existence where Infinite Forgiveness, Infinite Mercy, Infinite Understanding, Infinite Patience, Infinite Compassion and Infinite Love all exist and are ours both within and without.

But, wait, there’s more.  (Sorry, it was too tempting to write that sentence.)  We don’t have to wait until we die to accept this, because of our own freewill, we can choose – within our hearts and minds today to act, to think, to relate, to treat others from that place within us where God lives and where we can draw upon Infinite Mercy, Infinite Patience, Infinite Forgiveness, Infinite Understanding and Infinite Love when dealing with each other.  This is called, “creating a Heaven on Earth.”

God has given us freewill to make our own choices.  These choices of actions, feelings, emotions, thoughts, beliefs and more, – we make these choices every minute of every day.  As humans, we are a mixed bag of all of these, including being judgmental and condemning at times.  With that, it’s not unheard of our wanting God to follow our lead and be like we are, judging who and what we judge, rather than us follow Christ’s lead – being patient, forgiving and merciful – letting go of judgement.

Thank you, again, for your comments and question.  This is how I answer, and I’m sure it is very different than many others’ answer.

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“None of us understands God, as much as God understands God.”  (The Rainbow Cards, ©, 2014, Jodie Senkyrik)

“As we pray for others, so are we praying for ourselves.” (The Rainbow Cards, ©, 2003-2015, Jodie Senkyrik)

“To successfully forgive, we must let go of the benefits we believe we get from NOT forgiving.” (The Rainbow Cards, ©, 1999-2015, Jodie Senkyrik)

“Feeling peace is not experiencing God.  Helping someone else feel peace is experiencing God.” (The Rainbow Cards, ©, 1999-2015, Jodie Senkyrik)