Logic and God

Logic and debates can never prove the existence or non-existence of God.  The foundation of an experience of God is not a “mind” experience and will never be a “mind” experience.  God exists centered in the heart, and is only recognized through the heart.

Looking at it metaphysically, we can offer the same argument put forth about Love.  How do we prove Love?  This is an equally valid question when asked to prove the existence of God.

The experience of Love is an inner experience.  It is subjective, confusing, a struggle and full of questions.  But, when the day comes that we know that we love someone or someones, we know it from a place of “knowing” from which we alone can be sure. No one else in the world can experience our love for another from inside of us.  No one else in the world can experience our love for another in any way, except from outside of us looking in.

The experience of God is exactly like that.  We experience God solely within ourselves – and only we, our self, are witness to this inner experience.  In truth, no one can have an experience of God through someone else’s mind, someone else’s heart, and someone else’s soul.

Ultimately, the decisions we have related to God’s existence, are for each individual alone to address.  But, it needs to be this way.  The decisions and questions related to a belief or experience of God are the decisions and questions of “Willingness.”  Only in our own hearts do we decide what we are willing to do in our life – what we’re willing to think, willing to feel, willing to believe, and willing to …. everything else.  In the same way, only within our own selves do we decide what we’re willing to not think, not feel, not believe, and not…. everything else.

This is why logic isn’t what convinces anyone to love another, and logic isn’t what convinces anyone to believe in God.

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“We believe that which we believe, because that is what we’ve chosen to believe.  We don’t believe that which we don’t believe, because that is what we’ve chosen not to believe.” (The Rainbow Cards, 1995, ©, Jodie Senkyrik)

“The issue isn’t whether we can or can’t do something.  The issue is whether we’re willing … to do what it takes to do that something.  If we’re not willing to do “whatever”, then, of course, we can’t.” (The Rainbow Cards, 1995, ©, Jodie Senkyrik)